Bloomsbury - history, literature, education and afternoon tea!

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Home to some of the most important literary, cultural, medical and educational institutions in London, Bloomsbury is a busy part of the capital.

Home to some of the most important literary, cultural, medical and educational institutions in London, Bloomsbury is a busy part of the capital and is visited by millions each year. Developed by the Russell family as a fashionable residential area for the wealthy back in the 17th century, Bloomsbury is filled with pretty white Georgian townhouses, tree-lined streets and garden squares.  The area boasts strong literary links and was once home to a whole host of prominent British writers including Virginia Woolf and E.M, Forster who famously called themselves the Bloomsbury Set. The British Museum is at its very heart, one of London’s most prominent tourist attractions and home to an abundance of human art and artefacts whilst academic institutions such as Birbeck College, RADA drama school and the University of London Library are also found within its boundaries. Take a stroll through the streets of Bloomsbury and discover the area’s rich history where it is said that Karl Marx first created communism and Charles Darwin first conceived his theory of natural selection.

Bordering King’s Cross to the north and Fitzrovia and Covent Garden to the west, its central location makes it the perfect destination for an afternoon tea in the capital and is the natural choice for those visiting the British Museum. There are plenty of superb afternoon tea venues to choose from in Bloomsbury too with options to suit all budgets.

The Court Restaurant at the British Museum is a brilliant choice for anyone wanting to enjoy a well-priced afternoon tea after a long morning’s trek around the exhibits. At just £19.50 per person for a traditional afternoon tea or £25 with a glass of Prosecco, the Court Restaurant offers a modern and stylish setting within the museum and a superb afternoon tea which includes savouries such as Provencal red pepper and goat’s cheese tart and Irish beef pastrami and rocket brioche and an array of tasty sweet treats.

One of our favourite afternoon teas in Bloomsbury is at the brilliant Ambassador’s Bloomsbury hotel. Just a short walk from the museum and only 3 minutes from Euston station, the Ambassador’s Bloomsbury offer a wonderful afternoon tea and at just £15 per person (exclusive to our customer’s only) it is unbelievable value for money.

Set in a stunning Grade II listed Georgian building just a few streets away from the British Museum; the Bloomsbury Hotel was once the Queen’s favourite place to drink tea.  Taking place in the beautiful surroundings of Lutyen’s Lounge, guests are treated to a sumptuous afternoon tea. Prices from £35 per person.

It would be impossible to discuss afternoon tea in Bloomsbury without giving the inimitable Beas of Bloomsbury a mention. Housed in a former bank along Theobalds Road and close to the hustle and bustle of Holborn, Beas serves a legendary afternoon tea from their open plan pastry kitchen. Tuck into the most divine cupcakes, a selection of mini meringues and the most mouth-watering Valrhona brownies. Prices start at £24.50.

Check out our dedicated Bloomsbury page for more great afternoon tea venues.

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The Afternoon Tea Blog

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